AVRO Association of Vehicle Recovery OperatorsAVRO Association of Vehicle Recovery Operators

Training Hints and Tips

Training & Safety Tips from members, companies and IVR - Institute of Vehicle Recovery

(Avro or others takes no responsibily for actions or liablity in this safety advice)

Secondary Restraint

Secondary Restraint for light underlift No.001

IVR Safety Bulletin No. 1

A recent near miss has raised concerns for the Institute and it wishes to inform everyone of the potential problem.

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A Powerlift with a Mercedes Sprinter 311 on a front lift was approaching the summit of a steep incline, the technician changed from 2nd gear to 1st, this caused a lag in the transmission and the casualty to rock violently in the spec lift frame.

The shock load broke both yoke straps, the casualty became detached from the spec frame and rolled into the vehicle travelling behind, causing substantial damage to both vehicles, but fortunately no injuries. The advice at this time is to use the brother strap as a secondary restraint. By attaching the pull ring to the spec frame by a shackle, (possibly at the low pull point) this will ensure that the casualty cannot run away from the recovery vehicle in the event the securing straps break. Technicians must ensure that there is enough slack in the brother strap to allow for the articulation of the spec frame.

For more information about this incident or any other Health and Safety issue please contact Terry Crampton (CAE), MIMI, FIVR, Training, Assessment and Quality Management Representative on behalf of IVR (UK) Limited, on 07710 458230.

 This picture shows a typical connection on an RDT type unit

 In this picture the casualty is secured to the Underlift using a wire loop.

 When the Brother strap is used as the secondary restraint it can be fitted like this.

 Instructors will be asked to ensure this is included in any training programme for VR05 and the Institute will update the course standards accordingly.

 

Thanks to the IVR for this safety message

 

Propshaft Removal Safety

Propshaft Removal No.002

IVR Safety Bulletin - Number 002

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) recently contacted the Institute of Vehicle Recovery (IVR) to enquire if there is a ‘safe system of work’ for the removal of propshafts, as a technician had been injured when a centre bearing spacer struck him on the head during removal.

Investigations previously carried out by the IVR had highlighted a number of ways to support the propshaft, which is the key factor when disconnecting or removing it.

The IVR recommends;

For disconnection at the roadside

Support the weight of the propshaft using either a rope, ratchet strap or a piece of equipment similar to that shown in the photograph.

Remove the bolts and where possible tighten the support until the propshaft is held tight against the chassis, to minimize any movement during travel. To refit using the ratchet and rope, as in the photograph, simply lower the propshaft until the bolt holes are re-aligned, fit the bolts and tighten. Where a ratchet strap has been used care should be taken not to release the tension until the propshaft weight has been supported and it can be lowered safely to refit the bolts.

Where possible remove a halfshaft in preference to the propshaft.

IMPORTANT - Care should be taken to ensure that where the propshaft is connected at the gearbox or centre bearing by a spline it cannot become disconnected during travel as this can have a catastrophic outcome.

Some propshafts are connected using ‘single use’ bolts. Technicians must be aware of this or seek advice to ensure that they are not refitted after removal.

For disconnection in the workshop

Where only the rear flange of the propshaft needs removing, e.g. to facilitate work on the rear axle, use the guide above.

Where the complete propshaft needs removing additional safety measures need to be in place. The propshaft needs supporting throughout its length and once disconnected should be lowered slowly to a position where it can be safely removed from the gearbox sliding flange.

Support can be achieved in many ways, but the criteria that should be applied must be safety. Where the support is manual then handling techniques must be applied.

Where the support is mechanical then the equipment must be mechanically sound.

Where straps or ropes are used they must be inspected to ensure there is no damage likely to cause a failure of the equipment. It should also be noted that in the workshop manufacturer’s technical instructions should be followed.

Employers and technicians are reminded that whilst this safety bulletin will help them carry out this task more safely the final responsibility lies with the technician at the scene and any final decision on how to perform the task must be as a result of their risk assessment. This bulletin is for guidance only and the IVR cannot be held responsible for the way in which the task is performed.

PLEASE NOTE - Employers and technicians are reminded that whilst this safety bulletin will help them carry out this task more safely the final responsibility lies with the technician at the scene and any final decision on how to perform the task must be as a result of their risk assessment.

This bulletin is for guidance only and the IVR cannot be held responsible for the way in which the task is performed.

For more information about this safety bulletin or any other Health and Safety issue please contact Terry Crampton (CAE), MIMI, FIVR, Training, Assessment and

Quality Management Representative on behalf of IVR (UK) Limited, on

07710 458230.

Caravan Recovery

IVR Safety Bulletin No.4 Car and Caravan Combinations

On two occasions during recent training exercises a caravan on its side, connected to a vehicle, has up-righted itself in high winds.  On both occasions, prior to the incident, the casualty vehicle's rear wheels were off the ground but still attached via the 50mm ball hitch.

Recommendations

Technicians must be acutely aware of high winds when dealing with this situation and incorporate the necessary precautions within their Dynamic Risk Assessment with live jobs to minimise the dangers, not just to themselves, but others who could be affected.

The IVR recommends that technicians chock the front wheels of the casualty vehicle on arrival at the scene, prior to connecting any equipment, and take into consideration that the car and caravan in these circumstances will be under stress. This should also be taken into consideration within the Dynamic Risk Assessment.

car and caravan for web

Car with overturned caravan

Employers and technicians are reminded that whilst this safety bulletin will help them carry out this task more safely the final responsibility lies with the technician at the scene and any final decision on how to perform the task must be as a result of their risk assessment. This bulletin is for guidance only and the IVR cannot be held responsible for the way in which the task is performed.

Many thanks to the IVR for this safety message

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